The philosophy of animal welfare

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For activists like Shah and Kafle, the philosophy of animal welfare is innate to all human beings, but waiting to be realised in most of them. They view affection of animals has been an integral part of human society since the beginning of civilisation in any part of the world.

Perhaps that is why all religions have been kind to animals. “Hindus worship animals. We have festivals dedicated to cows and dogs. Further, every god and goddess we worship has an animal as his or her bahana (vehicle) and we take them as their representatives. We are proud that Buddha was born in Nepal. We even sell his name to earn a global fame as ‘peace-lovers’, but we forget the essence of Buddhism: compassion to everyone and everything,” Shah presents herself as a spiritual lecturer as she lists out other sects and religions, “And, the western world has become ahead of us in terms of animal welfare.”

“The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated,” Kafle quotes Mahatma Gandhi as Shah’s explanation reminds one of Augustinian theory of education from early Christianity, “Everyone is born learned with knowledge. What you require now is to revive it, to realise it.”

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